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Crop Loss Assessment in Rice

  • James A. Litsinger
Part of the Springer Series in Experimental Entomology book series (SSEXP)

Abstract

Mature and immature stages of insects injure rice plants by chewing leaf and root tissue, boring and tunneling into stems, or sucking out fluids—plant sap or photosynthates—from stems and grains. Injury from feeding leads to damage symptoms of skeletonized and defoliated leaves, deadhearts, whiteheads, stunted and wilted plants, and unfilled or pecky grains. Indirect damage from insect injury may slow or hasten the growth rate or allow pathogens to enter the plant.

Keywords

Yield Loss Insect Pest Crop Loss Stem Borer Gall Midge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

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  • James A. Litsinger

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