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The Problems of Prognosis

  • Bryan D. Fantie
  • Bryan Kolb
Part of the Springer Series in Neuropsychology book series (SSNEUROPSYCHOL)

Abstract

This chapter discusses the issues involved when a neuropsychologist undertakes the difficult proposition of predicting the limits of functional recovery in a person who has suffered brain damage. We shall review the major mechanisms through which the central nervous system responds to injury and summarize some of the indicators used to predict outcome. In order to understand better the impact that brain injury has on the lives of the victims and their families, we will discuss the issue of what exactly “recovery” of function after brain damage means and the factors that can affect it. We shall consider also the theoretical and practical concerns that guide neuropsychological research and its clinical application.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Brain Injury Head Injury Head Trauma Brain Damage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

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  • Bryan D. Fantie
  • Bryan Kolb

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