Control of Extremity Motor Prostheses: The Motor Feedback Applications

  • Chandler Allen Phillips

Abstract

Control systems are classically divided into two categories depending on the configuration of the system elements. The first category is a feed-forward or “open-loop” control system where the signal path (or paths) all proceed in one direction (Fig. 2.1a). The system, G (e.g., a motor or other actuator), is driven by a controller, K. With an open-loop system, a change in the output signal (θ0) is proportional to a change in the reference (driving) signal (θr) multiplied by the gain of the controller (K) and the system (G) (Fig. 2.1a).

Keywords

Fatigue Radar Adenosine Assure Neurol 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chandler Allen Phillips
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biomedical and Human Factors EngineeringCollege of Engineering and Computer Science/School of Medicine, Wright State UniversityDaytonUSA

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