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Phonological Awareness and Early Reading Ability: One Perspective

Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Language and Communication book series (SSLAN, volume 28)

Abstract

My interest in the psychology of reading and the problem of early reading disability began in 1977, when I was nearing the completion of a doctoral thesis on a very different topic. In the 12 years that have intervened, the determinants of early reading ability have become one of the major focuses of my research, largely because I was fortunate enough to become a post-doctoral fellow and, ultimately, a research associate at Haskins Laboratories. Nurtured by that very special research environment, I collaborated with an excellent team of psychologists, linguists, and educators, who were grappling with questions about what makes written language “possible” and at the some time, so “difficult.” The concept of phonological awareness has led to progress in answering both of these questions, and I have taken this chapter as an opportunity to review my own discovery of its importance.

Keywords

Phonological Awareness Reading Ability Poor Reader Reading Disability Phoneme Awareness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

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