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Phonological Awareness: A Bridge Between Language and Literacy

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Part of the Springer Series in Language and Communication book series (SSLAN, volume 28)

Abstract

I started investigating phonological awareness because of its relationships with literacy acquisition. There is, however, a further passionately interesting issue for cognitive psychologists, namely, how phonological awareness is related to the language system. In some sense, phonological awareness lies, like a bridge, between language and literacy. It belongs to either function. On the one hand, phonological awareness refers to a special category of phonological representations; on the other hand, some of its forms are part of the process of literacy acquisition and remain tied to literacy codes. The aim of this chapter is to embrace both issues in an integrative manner.

Keywords

Phonological Awareness Speech Perception Phonemic Awareness Phonological Representation Phonological Similarity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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