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Gibberellins pp 106-113 | Cite as

Gibberellin A3-Regulated α-Amylase Synthesis and Calcium Transport in the Endoplasmic Reticulum of Barley Aleurone Cells

  • D. S. Bush
  • L. Sticher
  • R. L. Jones
Conference paper

Abstract

The cereal aleurone layer has emerged as an excellent model system for studies of the mode of action of gibberellins (GAs).1 Experiments with protoplasts from the aleurone layer of wild oat have been used to probe the nature of the putative GA receptor,2 and protoplasts from the aleurone layer of barley have been used for the isolation of transcriptionally active nuclei for studies of the molecular basis of GA action.3

Keywords

Calcium Transport Microsomal Membrane Aleurone Layer Aleurone Cell Barley Aleurone Layer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. S. Bush
  • L. Sticher
  • R. L. Jones

There are no affiliations available

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