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The Potential for Interference among the Pollen Grains of Wild Radish

  • Diane L. Marshall
  • Michael W. Folsom
Conference paper

Abstract

The potential of pollen competition to sort among growing pollen tubes is widely recognized (Mulcahy and Mulcahy, 1987). Differential access to ovules may allow fertilization by the most vigorous pollen tubes. And, because gene expression in seedlings overlaps substantially with that in pollen tubes (Ottaviano and Mulcahy, 1990), pollen competition may result in production of superior progeny. In fact, increases in pollen competition have been shown to improve progeny growth in a variety of species (e.g., Mulcahy and Mulcahy, 1987; Winsor et al., 1987; Schlichting et al., 1990).

Keywords

Pollen Tube Pollen Germination Pollen Donor Pollen Load Single Pollination 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diane L. Marshall
  • Michael W. Folsom

There are no affiliations available

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