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Soil Water Repellency

  • M. G. Wallis
  • D. J. Horne
Part of the Advances in Soil Science book series (SOIL, volume 20)

Abstract

Water repellent soils exhibit hydrophobic properties when dry, resisting or retarding water infiltration into the soil matrix (Brandt, 1969a). Infiltration rates may be reduced by an order of magnitude, even in soils which visually appear to wet “normally” (Wallis et al., 1991). Repellent soils have been reported in many countries (DeBano and Letey, 1969) and may occupy large areas, such as the sandy soils of South and Western Australia (Bond, 1969a). However, severe repellency is relatively uncommon, and hence the condition is generally regarded as interesting but inconsequential. Indeed, the assumption of nonwater-repellent behavior is the norm in soil physics (Philip, 1969).

Keywords

Contact Angle Water Repellency Wetting Agent Apparent Contact Angle Soil Water Repellency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. G. Wallis
  • D. J. Horne

There are no affiliations available

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