Theories of Luteinizing Hormone Releasing Hormone Neuronal Migration: Mechanisms and Biological Importance

  • Marlene Schwanzel-Fukuda
  • Donald W. Pfaff
Conference paper
Part of the Serono Symposia, USA book series (SERONOSYMP)

Abstract

Luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (also called gonadotropin hormone releasing hormone) is a decapeptide present in the brain and nose of all species of vertebrates, including humans. Essential for reproductive functions, it has been shown to regulate the release of both luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone from gonadotropes of the anterior pituitary gland (1) and to facilitate reproductive behavior (2, 3).

Keywords

Migration Agarose Retina Syringe Polypeptide 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marlene Schwanzel-Fukuda
  • Donald W. Pfaff

There are no affiliations available

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