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Atmospheric Deposition and Pollutant Exposure of Eastern U.S. Forests

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Ecology and Decline of Red Spruce in the Eastern United States

Part of the book series: Ecological Studies ((ECOLSTUD,volume 96))

Abstract

To evaluate the hypothesis that exposure of forests to acidic and other airborne chemicals may influence forest health in the eastern U.S., it is necessary to characterize the physical and chemical inputs. The atmospheric concentration of chemicals in the vicinity of forested ecosystems under study (exposure) and the fluxes of chemicals to the canopy and eventually to the soil (deposition) are the two key parameters that must be quantified.

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Mohnen, V.A. (1992). Atmospheric Deposition and Pollutant Exposure of Eastern U.S. Forests. In: Eagar, C., Adams, M.B. (eds) Ecology and Decline of Red Spruce in the Eastern United States. Ecological Studies, vol 96. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-2906-3_3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-2906-3_3

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