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Integrated Services for Adolescents With Disabilities

  • Stephen Richards
  • David L. Lovett
  • Robert Gaylord-Ross
Part of the Disorders of Human Learning, Behavior, and Communication book series (HUMAN LEARNING)

Abstract

Secondary education should be designed to prepare students for adult life. Choices must be made concerning the skills to be learned that will improve outcomes upon leaving school. When poor decisions are made, the potential costs to individuals and to society are staggering. Many secondary education programs use relatively ineffective instructional methodologies to teach adolescents with disabilities. In addition, the curriculum that is presented to students who require special education frequently does not address their needs. Considerable numbers of students in special services drop out of school prior to graduation. In a large national study, 44% of secondary special education students did not graduate (Wagner, 1989), compared to approximately 29% of students without disabilities. Those who do graduate are rarely prepared to succeed as adults. We believe that, given an appropriate education, most students who need special services can succeed in school and as adults in the community. In chapter 10 of this volume, the authors address methods to assist adults with disabilities following graduation. In this chapter, we will address major issues related to the secondary education level and outline strategies for use at that level to improve the lives of students after they leave school.

Keywords

Vocational Rehabilitation Integrate Service Transition Service Competitive Employment Individualize Education Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Richards
  • David L. Lovett
  • Robert Gaylord-Ross

There are no affiliations available

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