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Making a Scene: The Debate about Context Effects for Scenes and Sentences

  • Judith F. Kroll
Part of the Springer Series in Neuropsychology book series (SSNEUROPSYCHOL)

Abstract

The chapters in this section address a variety of problems that arise in considering the processes that mediate scene perception and comprehension: What is the effect of viewing degraded presentations? How does scene context influence the perception and identification of individual objects? And what is the relation between eye movements and visual attention?

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judith F. Kroll

There are no affiliations available

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