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Regional Evaluations of Acid Deposition Effects on Forests

  • Dale W. Johnson
  • Steven E. Lindberg
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 91)

Abstract

Having reviewed the results of the Integrated Forest Study (IFS) project, we now try to place the results in a larger perspective by very briefly summarizing acid deposition effects and their potential role in forest health in the several forest types represented in the IFS project. This chapter gives brief overviews of the situation in eastern spruce-fir, eastern hardwood, and southern pine forests in North America; and a very brief overview of air pollution in arid forest ecosystems in Europe (with special emphasis on the situation in Norway where the single European IFS site was located). What follows in this chapter is by no means intended to be a comprehensive review of forest health and atmospheric deposition; such an analysis would require a volume of this size for each forest type and is well beyond the scope of this chapter. A comprehensive analysis of forest health and the role of atmospheric deposition has been published for Norway spruce in Europe (Schulze et al. 1989), and one is in preparation for red spruce (Eagar and Adams, in press); the reader is referred to those volumes for a far more detailed discussion than is possible here. The intent of this chapter is merely to highlight those aspects of forest health and atmospheric deposition that have bearing on, or that can be illuminated by, the IFS results.

Keywords

Atmospheric Deposition Base Cation Sugar Maple Cloud Water Forest Decline 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dale W. Johnson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Steven E. Lindberg
    • 3
  1. 1.Biological Sciences Center Desert Research InstituteUniversity of Nevada SystemRenoUSA
  2. 2.Range, Wildlife and Forestry College of AgricultureUniversity of NevadaRenoUSA
  3. 3.Environmental Sciences DivisionOak Ridge National LaboratoryOak RidgeUSA

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