Acute Hemiplegia and Migraine

  • W. Isler
Part of the Principles of Pediatric Neurosurgery book series (PRINCPEDIATR)

Abstract

Migraine probably represents the most frequent condition in acute transient nontraumatic hemiplegia in the young age group. Hemiplegic migraine is a complex form of migraine characterized by the sudden onset of hemiparesis. Associated symptoms may include unilateral sensory loss and aphasia. Contralateral hemicranial, bilateral diffuse, or rarely ipsilateral headache usually follows but commonly precedes the neurological deficit. Other symptoms such as nausea and/or vomiting are common. The natural history of the migrainous hemisyndrome is usually benign, but permanent neurological sequelae may occur secondary to cerebral infarction.

Keywords

Cerebral Infarction Migraine Attack Migraine Patient Visual Aura Major Cerebral Artery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1992

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  • W. Isler

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