Specific Speech and Language Disorder

  • J. Bruce Tomblin

Abstract

The development of communication skills in the typical child occurs with virtually no effort or attention on the part of the parent or the child. The culmination of this process is an individual who can fully participate in society through this vehicle of communication. For some children this effortless process of language development is impeded and thus these children are described as having developmental language problems. Specifically, communication problems that involve a noticeable restriction in the individual’s acquisition of his or her native language are termed developmental language disorders.

Keywords

Depression Migraine Testosterone Neurol Rosen 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

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  • J. Bruce Tomblin

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