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The Role for Artificial Intelligence in Critical Care

  • Michael C. Higgins
Part of the Computers and Medicine book series (C+M)

Abstract

The other chapters in this book have discussed the variety of data used in the care of critically ill patients. Bedside monitoring equipment, ventilators, radiographic and other imaging procedures, laboratory tests, blood gas measurements, input and output record-keeping, drug administration, physical examination, and numerous other sources all contribute to the large volume of data that must be collected, processed, displayed, and interpreted in the ICU. Some of this work is being transferred to computers. Electronic patient information systems are now available from several vendors. Hospital-wide data networks and the use of computers in other departments are becoming commonplace. The automation of ICU data management most likely will accelerate with the adoption of communication standards like those discussed in chapters 8 and 9.

Keywords

Knowledge Base Serum Sodium Serum Sodium Level Serum Osmolality Certainty Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael C. Higgins

There are no affiliations available

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