Empirically Tested Interventions for Subtypes of Reading Disabilities

  • Robert F. Newby
  • Donna Recht
  • JoAnne Caldwell
Part of the Advances in Child Neuropsychology book series (CHILDNEUROPSYCH, volume 2)

Abstract

Research in child neuropsychology has contributed significantly to the differentiation of subtypes of learning disabilities over the past two decades. Recent research reviews have outlined a multitude of different subtype systems (Rourke, 1985; Lyon, 1985a). Although a consensus has not yet been reached on the most valid subtype classifications, several common themes are emerging. For instance, some mathematics disabilities are clearly attributable to an underlying, nonverbal learning disability (Rourke, 1989), and many reading disability subtypes can be related to underlying deficits in the dimensions of phonological or orthographic processing (Newby & Lyon, 1991). One of the most important assumptions behind the effort to specify different subtypes of learning disabilities involves the notion that different subtypes need different kinds of intervention. The term “educational validation” refers to research that examines this assumption (Fletcher, 1985; Lyon, 1985b; Newby & Lyon, 1991). Reading disability or developmental dyslexia represents the most common and most extensively studied class of learning disabilities. The main aim of this chapter is to examine several research programs that have attempted educational validation of subtypes of reading disabilities.

Keywords

Stein Cane Blindness Suffix Zine 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert F. Newby
  • Donna Recht
  • JoAnne Caldwell

There are no affiliations available

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