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Exposure of Children to Pollutants in House Dust and Indoor Air

  • John W. Roberts
  • Philip Dickey
Chapter
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 143)

Abstract

Indoor pollution has been ranked by the United States Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board (USEPA 1987, 1990) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC 1991) as a high environmental risk. Together, lead, contaminated soil, house dust, allergens, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous household chemicals, indoor air pollution, tobacco smoke, and other pollutants pose a significant environmental risk to children, adults, and pets. Home pollutant exposure may result in retarded growth, learning disabilities, allergies, cancer, nervous system damage, and other illnesses. We continue to allow, in many homes, exposures to these substances that would not be tolerated on the job or in the outdoor environment because most people, including political leaders, are not aware of the problem.

Keywords

House Dust Lead Poisoning Superfund Site Sick Building Syndrome Waste Management Association 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • John W. Roberts
    • 1
  • Philip Dickey
    • 2
  1. 1.Engineering Plus Inc.SeattleUSA
  2. 2.Washington Toxics CoalitionSeattleUSA

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