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Analysis of Risk Factors and Active Surveillance for BSE in Argentina

  • A. A. Schudel
  • B. J. Carrillo
  • E. L. Weber
  • J. Blanco Viera
  • E. J. Gimeno
  • C. Van Gelderen
  • E. Ulloa
  • A. Nader
  • B. G. Cané
  • R. H. Kimberlin
Part of the Serono Symposia USA Norwell, Massachusetts book series (SERONOSYMP)

Abstract

Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a new member of the scrapie-family of diseases that was first recognized in the United Kingdom in November 1986 (1) and subsequently developed into a major epidemic. BSE was caused by the contamination of cattle feed with a scrapie-like agent (2). The vehicle of infection was meat and bone meal (MBM), which is one of the two products of the rendering industry, and was commonly used as a protein-rich supplement to concentrated feedstuffs. Tallow, the other product of rendering, is also used in cattle feeds, but is not implicated as a source of infection (2). The association between BSE and the feeding of concentrates is the reason why the great majority of BSE cases have occurred in dairy cows and in beef suckler cows that originated from dairy herds (3). Although some cows with BSE were infected as adults, most were infected during calfhood (4).

Keywords

Dairy Cattle Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Sheep Population Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Case Histologic Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. A. Schudel
  • B. J. Carrillo
  • E. L. Weber
  • J. Blanco Viera
  • E. J. Gimeno
  • C. Van Gelderen
  • E. Ulloa
  • A. Nader
  • B. G. Cané
  • R. H. Kimberlin

There are no affiliations available

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