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Picking the Best Expert from a Sequence

  • Ruth Bergman
  • Ronald L. Rivest
Part of the Lecture Notes in Statistics book series (LNS, volume 112)

Abstract

We examine the problem of finding a good expert from a sequence of experts. Each expert has an “error rate”; we wish to find an expert with a low error rate. However, each expert’s error rate is unknown and can only be estimated by a sequence of experimental trials. Moreover, the distribution of error rates is also unknown. Given a bound on the total number of trials, there is thus a tradeoff between the number of experts examined and the accuracy of estimating their error rates.

We present a new expert-finding algorithm and prove an upper bound on the expected error rate of the expert found. A second approach, based on the sequential ratio test, gives another expert-finding algorithm that is not provably better but which performs better in our empirical studies.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruth Bergman
    • 1
  • Ronald L. Rivest
    • 2
  1. 1.Artificial Intelligence LaboratoryMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory for Computer ScienceMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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