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Amazing Light pp 355-365 | Cite as

The SH Radical: Laboratory Detection of its \(J = \frac{3}{2} \leftarrow \frac{1}{2}\)Rotational Transition

  • Egbert Klisch
  • Thomas Klaus
  • Sergei P. Belov
  • Gispert Winnewisser
  • Eric Herbst

Abstract

The terahertz region has remained one of the last frontiers of the electromagnetic spectrum to be fully exploited by spectroscopic investigations because of the various associated technological difficulties. High-resolution, broad-band scanning spectroscopy in the terahertz region has recently been achieved for the first time with microwave accuracy in the Cologne spectroscopy laboratory [1]. The successful frequency and phase stabilisation [2] of continuously tunable backward wave oscillators (BWOs) produced by the ISTOK Research and Production Company, Fryazino, Moscow region, was essential for this technological breakthrough. The unique feature of these Russian-produced BWOs is the ease with which they can be tuned over wide-frequency ranges, typically about 200 GHz at 1 THz, as has been amply demonstrated in an exemplary way by the recording of the rotational spectra of HSSH [1], the dimer of SH [4], and its isotopomers HSSD and DSSD [1]. So far, high resolution spectroscopy in the terahertz region has been achieved by tunable far-IR laser sideband techniques [5], but with known limitations in continuous broadband scanning capability.

Keywords

Hyperfine Structure Rotational Spectrum Hyperfine Component Centrifugal Distortion High Resolution Spectroscopy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Egbert Klisch
  • Thomas Klaus
  • Sergei P. Belov
  • Gispert Winnewisser
  • Eric Herbst

There are no affiliations available

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