Abstract

Wear is the removal of material from one or both of two solid surfaces in a solid-state contact. It occurs when solid surfaces are in a sliding, rolling, or impact motion relative to one another. Wear occurs through surface interactions at asperities, and components may need replacement after a relatively small amount of material has been removed or if the surface is unduly roughened. In well-designed tribological systems, the removal of material is usually a very slow process but it is very steady and continuous. The generation and circulation of wear debris, particularly in machine applications where the clearances are small relative to the wear particle size, may be more of a problem than the actual amount of wear.

Keywords

Porosity Nickel Brittle Chlorine Agglomeration 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bharat Bhushan
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Microtribology and Contamination Laboratory, Department of Mechanical EngineeringThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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