Current Perspectives

  • Lothar W. Popp
Part of the Clinical Perspectives in Obstetrics and Gynecology book series (CPOG)

Abstract

The traditional competition between vaginal versus abdominal surgical procedures has acquired the facet of operative laparoscopy. Today, almost all gynecologic operations that previously required laparotomy are being performed endoscopically. A number of procedures (e.g., tubal sterilization) have obvious advantages and are commonly accepted as the method of choice. On the other hand, the best approach to procedures such as hysterectomy or ovarian surgery continue to be debated. A third group of laparoscopic interventions are merely new or nongynecologic at first glance and consequently are involved in a struggle for acceptance. This group includes such procedures as creation of a neovagina, appendectomy, and herniorrhaphy.

Keywords

Catheter Foam Mold Iodine Sponge 

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

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  • Lothar W. Popp

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