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Pelvic and Acetabular Fractures

  • Dana C. Mears

Abstract

Significant or displaced fractures of the pelvic ring and acetabulum constitute a diverse group of skeletal injuries that usually result from motor vehicular accidents, industrial trauma, or falls from great heights. The typical pelvic ring disruption requires the application of immense forces to the patient, who thereby is likely to present with other serious or life-threatening injuries involving the musculoskeletal (85%), respiratory (60%), central nervous (40%), gastrointestinal (30%), urologic (12%), and cardiovascular (6%) systems.1 The management of a pelvic ring fracture, therefore, requires a concomitant diagnosis and treatment of the other systemic and musculoskeletal injuries. About 50% of acetabular fracture patients have sustained associated injuries, and about 30% have experienced injuries to three or more organ sys­tems. As McMurtry et al.,2 Tile,3 and others4 have emphasized, a meticulous diagnostic protocol is needed that prioritizes the evaluation of diverse organ systems by the degree of urgency. From a recent report by Dalal et al.,5 a correlation of the pelvic injury pattern with the statistical likelihood for particular patterns of associated visceral injuries may facilitate the application of diverse diagnostic procedures.

Keywords

Guide Wire Sacroiliac Joint Pelvic Ring Acetabular Fracture Cannulated Screw 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1996

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  • Dana C. Mears

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