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Analysis of CO2, Temperature, and Moisture Effects on Carbon Storage in Alaskan Arctic Tundra Using a General Ecosystem Model

  • Edward B. Rastetter
  • Robert B. McKane
  • Gaius R. Shaver
  • Knute J. Nadelhoffer
  • Anne Giblin
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 124)

Abstract

Projected changes in global climate associated with accumulations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere might stimulate the release of a substantial portion of the estimated 4.3 × 1016g of carbon stored in wet and moist arctic tundras (Oechel, 1989; Shaver et al., 1992). About 98% of this carbon is in soils and has accumulated over thousands of years as a result of cold, wet conditions that serve to slow decomposition. Increased temperatures will stimulate decomposition and hence release CO2 from soils to the atmosphere. However, increased CO2, increased temperature, and higher amounts of available nitrogen (as a result of faster decomposition) could stimulate rates of production in vegetation and thereby also stimulate CO2 removal from the atmosphere. The key to which of these two opposing processes dominates appears to be closely tied to the nitrogen cycle (Billings et al., 1984; Rastetter et al., 1992; Shaver et al., 1992).

Keywords

Soil Moisture Carbon Storage Arctic Tundra Tundra Soil Arctic Ecosystem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward B. Rastetter
  • Robert B. McKane
  • Gaius R. Shaver
  • Knute J. Nadelhoffer
  • Anne Giblin

There are no affiliations available

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