The Uptake and Metabolism of Substrates by Endothelium in the Lung

  • John H. Linehan
  • Said H. Audi
  • Christopher A. Dawson

Abstract

The work of Vane (16) and others (8, 9, 15) showed that a number of vasoactive substances carried in venous blood are removed from the blood and/or chemically modified by the pulmonary endothelial cells during passage through the pulmonary circulation. This stimulated interest in developing the means for evaluating these “nonrespiratory functions” of the lung. A further motivation for attempting to understand the metabolic functions of the pulmonary endothelium is the concept that, if these metabolic functions of the endothelium could be measured in vivo, they might provide information about the physiological or pathophysiological status of the endothelial cells.

Keywords

Hydrolysis Convection Albumin Serotonin Proline 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • John H. Linehan
  • Said H. Audi
  • Christopher A. Dawson

There are no affiliations available

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