Advertisement

Capturing Patients’ Perceptions in the Computer—Based Patient Record: Essential Prerequisites to the Measurement of Health—Related Outcomes

  • William L. Holzemer
  • Cheryl A. Reilly
  • Suzanne B. Henry
  • C. J. Portillo
Part of the Computers and Medicine book series (C+M)

Abstract

The cost, quality, and outcomes of healthcare services have become the focus of national attention as providers, consumers, and payers of healthcare services grapple with healthcare reform in the United States. As policy makers and healthcare providers seek to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare services, there is a critical need to understand the relationships between structure and process characteristics and client, provider, and setting outcomes. Given the importance of patient care data to the activities of all segments of the healthcare spectrum, the development and implementation of computer—based patient records (CPRs) has been recommended as CPRs have the potential to improve healthcare delivery, enhance outcomes research programs, and increase hospital efficiency [12]. The purpose of this paper is to advocate for the patient as an essential user of CPRs.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    Aaronson, N. K. “Quality of life research in oncology: Past achievements and future priorities.” Cancer(1991) 67: 839 – 843PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. [2]
    Institute of Medicine. The computer-based patient record: An essential technology for healthcare. Washington: National Academy Press (1991)Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    Blacklow, R. S. Preface. In R. S. Blacklow (ed). MacBryde’s Signs and Symptoms. Philadelphia: Lippincott (1983) p. xiGoogle Scholar
  4. [4]
    Camp, L. D. “A comparison of nurses’ recorded assessments of pain with perceptions of pain as described by cancer patients.” Cancer Nursing(1988) 11: 237 – 243PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. [5]
    Evans D. A., Cimino J. J., Hersh W. R., Huff S. M., & Bell D. S. (for the Canon Group). “Toward a medical—concept representation language.” Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association(1994) 1: 207 – 217PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. [6]
    Fries J. F., & Spitz P. W. “The hierarchy of patient outcomes.” In Spilker, B. (ed). Quality of Life Assessments in Clinical Trials. New York: Raven Press (1990) pp. 25 – 36Google Scholar
  7. [7]
    Greenfield S., & Nelson E. C. “Recent developments and future issues in the use of health status assessment measures in clinical settings.” Medical Care. (1992) 30 (5 Supp.): MS23—MS41Google Scholar
  8. [8]
    Grossman S. A., Sheidler V. R., Swedeen K., Mucenski J., & Piantadosi S. “Correlation of patient and caregiver ratings of cancer pain.” Journal of Pain and Symptom Management(1991) 6 (2): 53 – 57PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. [9]
    Hegyvary S. T. “Patient care outcomes related to management of symptoms.” Annual Review of Nursing Research(1993)Google Scholar
  10. [10]
    Holmes, S., & Eburn, E. “Patients’ and nurses’ perceptions of symptom distress in cancer.” Journal of Advanced Nursing(1989) 14: 840 – 846PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. [11]
    Holmes, S., & Eburn, E. “Patients’ and nurses’ perceptions of symptom distress in cancer.” Journal of Advanced Nursing(1989) 14: 840 – 846PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. [12]
    Institute of Medicine. The computer—based patient record. Washington, DC: National Academy Press (1991)Google Scholar
  13. [13]
    Institute of Medicine. The computer—based patient record. Washington, DC: National Academy Press (1991)Google Scholar
  14. [14]
    Larson P. J., Viele C. S., Coleman S., Dibble S. L., & Cebulski C. “Comparison of perceived symptoms of patients undergoing bone marrow transplant and the nurses caring for them.” Oncology Nursing Forum(1993) 20 (1): 81 – 87PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. [15]
    Longo D. R. “Patient practice variation: A call for research.” Medical Care. (1993) 31(5 Suppl.): YS81—YS85Google Scholar
  16. [16]
    De Moor G. J. E. “Standardization in medical informatics.” In. vap Bemmel J. H, & McCray A. T. (eds). Yearbook of Medical Informatics 1993, pp. 61–66Google Scholar
  17. [17]
    Reiser S. J. “The era of the patient: Using the experience of illness in shaping the missions of healthcare.” JAMA(1993) 269 (8): 1012 – 1017PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. [18]
    Rhodes, V.A. & Watson, P.M. “Symptom distress—the concept: Past and present.” Seminars in Oncology Nursing(1987) 3 (4): 242 – 247PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. [19]
    Strickland O. L. Measures and instruments. In U.S. DHHS, U.S. Public Health Services, National Institutes of Health. Patient Outcomes Research: Examining the Effectiveness of Nursing Practice (1992) pp. 145–153Google Scholar
  20. [20]
    Verbrugge L. M., & Ascione F. J. “Exploring the iceberg: Common symptoms and how people care for them.” Medical Care(1987) 25: 539 – 561PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. [21]
    Vessey J. A., & Richardson B. L. “A holistic approach to symptom assessment and intervention.” Holistic Nursing Practice(1993) 7 (2): 13 – 21PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • William L. Holzemer
  • Cheryl A. Reilly
  • Suzanne B. Henry
  • C. J. Portillo

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations