Interfacing and Linking Nursing Information Systems to Optimize Patient Care

  • Susan McDermott
Part of the Computers and Medicine book series (C+M)

Abstract

Nurses spend a great deal of time gathering and assimilating information to provide patient care. Lange [1] notes that nurses spend the first part of their shift in information seeking behavior related to planning interventions and other patient activities. In addition, Lange notes that medication schedules and other information related to medications are the most frequently sought type of information yet assessments and nursing summaries require more time for retrieval. With computerized nursing documentation systems interfaced to other hospital systems more information would be available for nursing computer displays and reports. Many hospitals have or plan NIS based entirely upon a network of microcomputers not interfaced to HIS. Local area networks (LANS) are increasingly being utilized in hospitals because personal computers are becoming more powerful and capable of handling textual and graphic information which is a major requirement of nursing information systems.[2]

Keywords

Catheter Clarification 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan McDermott

There are no affiliations available

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