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Production of Inhibin-Related Peptides by Ovarian Tumors

  • Henry G. Burger
  • Anna Baillie
  • Nicholas F. Cahir
  • Ann E. Drummond
  • Chandan J. Gurusinghe
  • David L. Healy
  • Tom W. Jobling
  • Pamela M. Mamers
  • David M. Robertson
  • Beatrice J. Susil
Part of the Serono Symposia USA book series (SERONOSYMP)

Abstract

Ovarian cancer is the most common fatal gynecological malignancy, responsible for more deaths than all other forms of gynecological cancer combined. Lifetime risks for development of the disease are estimated to lie in the range of 1 in 80 to 1 in 100, with a population prevalence of approximately 30 per 100,000 women. Most patients with the disease present at an advanced stage, with 30% surviving for 5 years with a diagnosis of stage 3 epithelial malignancy (representing local and pelvic extraperitoneal spread) while only 5%–10% survive with stage 4 disease (disseminated malignancy).

Keywords

Ovarian Cancer Granulosa Cell Ovarian Tumor Mucinous Tumor Granulosa Cell Tumor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Henry G. Burger
  • Anna Baillie
  • Nicholas F. Cahir
  • Ann E. Drummond
  • Chandan J. Gurusinghe
  • David L. Healy
  • Tom W. Jobling
  • Pamela M. Mamers
  • David M. Robertson
  • Beatrice J. Susil

There are no affiliations available

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