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Sex-Steroid and GH Interactions in the Regulation of Lipid Metabolism

  • Staffan EdÉn
  • Jan Oscarsson
  • Malin Ottosson
Chapter
Part of the Proceedings in the Serono Symposia USA Series book series (SERONOSYMP)

Abstract

Growth hormone (GH) and sex steroids interact at several levels in the control of growth and body composition and reproduction. However, it is not completely clear which interactions are of primary significance for the effects of the respective hormones. For example, sex steroids influence the overall secretion and secretory pattern of GH (see Chapter 12, this volume), which may be of importance for the effects of GH on target tissues (see Chapters 32 and 33). On the other hand, GH may influence the responsiveness of target tissues to sex steroids or gonadotrophins (see Chapter 8).

Keywords

Growth Hormone Growth Hormone Secretion Human Adipose Tissue Secretory Pattern Adipose Tissue Mass 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Staffan EdÉn
  • Jan Oscarsson
  • Malin Ottosson

There are no affiliations available

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