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Butanol Production Using Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 Hyper-Butanol Producing Mutant Strain and Recovery by Pervaporation

  • N. Qureshi
  • H. P. Blaschek
Chapter
Part of the Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology book series (ABAB)

Abstract

Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 (mutant strain) and C. beijerinckii 8052 (wild type) were compared for substrate and butanol inhibition. The wild-type strain is more strongly inhibited by added butanol than is the mutant strain. Acetone and butanol were removed from a fed-batch reactor inoculated with C. beijerinckii BA101 by pervaporation using a silicone membrane. In the batch reactor, C. beijerinckii BA101 produced 25.3 g/L of total solvents, whereas in the fermentation-recovery experiment it produced 165.1 g/L of total solvents. Solvent productivity increased from 0.35 (batch reactor) to 0.98 g/L.h (fed-batch reactor). The fed-batch reactor was fed with 500 g/L of glucose-based P2 medium. Acetone selectivities ranged from 2 to 10 whereas butanol selectivities ranged from 7 to 19. Total flux varied from 26 to 31 g/m2.h.

Index Entries

Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 acetone butanol fed-batch reactor pervaporation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Qureshi
    • 1
  • H. P. Blaschek
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Food Science and Human NutritionUniversity of Illinois, Biotechnology and Bioengineering GroupUrbanaUSA

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