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Biomag 96 pp 142-145 | Cite as

SEFs from the Human Spinal Cord using a Novel Second Order Planar Gradiometer

  • A. I. Weir
  • U. Shahani
  • D. Hutson
  • G. Lang
  • P. M. Maas
  • C. M. Pegrum
  • G. B. Donaldson

Abstract

Somatosensory evoked fields (SEF) elicited by electrical and mechanical [1] Stimuli have been recorded from the cortex using SQUID gradiometers of various designs, and the SI and SII sources localised (2]. In clinical practice the equivalent evoked potential (EP) study would always be combined with recordings of the afferent pathway in the peripheral nerve and spinal cord. These spinal evoked potentials are complex recordings of afferent volleys [5]. SEF recordings of these locations have been limited due to a) the lack of devices with appropriate geometry for all locations b) the depth and orientation of the sources c) the need for highly screened environments (particularly for spinal cord measurements) d) the need for clinically unacceptable numbers of stimulus averages to achieve acceptable signal/noise ratios. To date for recordings of evoked magnetic fields from the spinal cord the most successful has been the use of a magnetometer in a highly shielded room and up to 8000 averages [3].

Keywords

Median Nerve Evoke Potential Median Nerve Stimulation Afferent Volley Consecutive Record 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Forss, N., Salmelin, R., & Hari, R. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, 1994, 92: 510–517.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Hari, R., Karhu, J., Hamalainen, M., Knuttila, J., Salonen, O., Sams, M., & Vilkman, V. European Journal of Neuroscience, 1993, 5: 724–734.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Curio, G., Mackert, B.-M., BurghofiF, M., Koetitz, S., Drung, D., & Marx, P. In: Baumgartner, I., Deeke, L., Stroink, G., Williamson, S.J., Biomagnetism: Fundamental Research and Clinical Applications, 1995.Google Scholar
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    Hutson, D., Lang, G., Shahani, U., Klein, U., Weston, R.G., Weir, A.I., Maas, P.M., Pegrum, C.M., and Donaldson, G.B. these proceedings.Google Scholar
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    Desmedt, J.D. In: Maurer K., Topographie Brain Mapping of EEG and Evoked Potentials, 1989.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. I. Weir
    • 1
  • U. Shahani
    • 1
  • D. Hutson
    • 2
  • G. Lang
    • 2
  • P. M. Maas
    • 2
  • C. M. Pegrum
    • 2
  • G. B. Donaldson
    • 2
  1. 1.Wellcome Biomagnetism UnitSouthern General HospitalGlasgowScotland
  2. 2.Department of Physics and Applied PhysicsUniversity of StrathclydeGlasgowScotland

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