Biomag 96 pp 1134-1137 | Cite as

Dynamic Neuroimaging by MEG, Constrained by MRI and fMRI

  • J. S. George
  • D. M. Schmidt
  • J. C. Mosher
  • C. J. Aine
  • D. M. Ranken
  • C. C. Wood
  • J. D. Lewine
  • J. A. Sanders
  • J. W. Belliveau
Conference paper

Abstract

MEG is a direct measure of the electrical activity of populations of neurons, with excellent temporal resolution. However, the spatial characterization of sources depends on the solution of an ill-posed inverse problem. MRI provides high resolution volumetric data defining the anatomy of the head and brain; alternative MRI data acquisition strategies allow mapping of hemodynamic correlates of neural function. However, functional MRI (fMRI) and related techniques are limited by the slow timecourse of the hemodynamic response and the ill-defined relationship between neural activation and associated hemodynamic changes. Given such complementary strengths and weaknesses, the integration of multiple imaging technologies should provide dynamic functional neuroimaging capabilities with optimal spatial and temporal resolution. We are exploring a range of strategies for the integrated analysis of data from MRI, fMRI and MEG.

Keywords

Lewine 

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References

  1. [1]
    Ranken, D., George, J. MRIVIEW: An interactive computational tool for investigation of brain structure and function, In: Nielson, G.M., Bergeron, D. IEEE Visualization’ 93, IEEE Computer Society Press, 1993Google Scholar
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    George, J.S., Sanders, J.S., Lewine, J.D., Caprihan, A., and Aine, C.J. Comparative Studies of brain activation with MEG and Functional MRI. In: Deecke, L., Baumgartner, C., Stroink, G. and Williamson, S.J., Biomagnetism: fundamental research and clinical applications. Elsevier/IOS, Amsterdam, 1995Google Scholar
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    George, J.S., Aine, C.J., Mosher, J.C., Ranken, D.M. Schlitt, H.A., Wood, C.C., Lewine, J.D., Sanders, J.A., Belliveau, J.W. Mapping function in the human brain with MEG, anatomical MRI and functional MRI, J. Clin.Neurophysiol., 1995, 12(5):406–431CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. S. George
    • 1
  • D. M. Schmidt
    • 1
  • J. C. Mosher
    • 1
  • C. J. Aine
    • 1
  • D. M. Ranken
    • 1
  • C. C. Wood
    • 1
  • J. D. Lewine
    • 2
  • J. A. Sanders
    • 2
  • J. W. Belliveau
    • 3
  1. 1.Los Alamos National LaboratoryLos AlamosUSA
  2. 2.New Mexico Regional Federal Medical CenterAlbuquerqueUSA
  3. 3.Massachusetts General Hospital NMR CenterCharlestownUSA

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