Biomag 96 pp 896-899 | Cite as

Measurements of Visual Evoked MEG Responses Associated with Color Discrimination

  • K. Ueno
  • S. Ueno
  • H. Weinberg
Conference paper

Abstract

Recent rapid progress of SQUID techniques made it possible to measure MEG signals over the whole cortex of the brain simultaneously. It is extremely important for evoked MEG research in which the signals have to be averaged. With auditory, visual and somatosensory stimulation, the electrical activities evoked by stimuli can be recorded as a response of the brain. Recently, investigations on higher brain function such as memory and cognition have been progressing. For example, P300 has been introduced as a neuro-electro-magnetic phenomenon associated with the higher brain function. The P300 is an electric response of the brain to target stimuli around 300msec after the onset of stimulation. Investigations of P300 have mainly focused on auditory evoked MEG[1]–[4]. We studied the P300 evoked by visual stimulation using a discrimination task consisting of two different colours and estimated the source of the P300 response using a 2-dipole model.

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References

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    E. Gordon et al., Magnetoencephalography: locating the source of P300 via magnetic field recording., Clinical & Experimental Neurology. 23:101–110. 1987.Google Scholar
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    R. Neshige and H. Luders. Recording of event-related potentials (P300) from human cortex., Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology. 9(2):294–298. 1992 Apr.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Ueno
    • 1
  • S. Ueno
    • 1
  • H. Weinberg
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Medical Electronics, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Brain Behaviour LaboratorySimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada

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