Biomag 96 pp 821-824 | Cite as

Magnetoencephalographic study on cerebral cortical activities related to speech

  • S. Kyuhou
  • K. Sasaki
  • A. Nambu
  • R. Matsuzaki
  • T. Tsujimoto
  • H. Gemba
Conference paper

Abstract

Human motor speech function has been investigated neuropsychologically [1]. Recently by using non-invasive techniques measuring regional cerebral blood flows such as the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) [3] and the positron emission tomography (PET) [5], it was demonstrated that several cortical areas not only in the dominant hemisphere but also in the non-dominant hemisphere were activated during speech tasks. As these methods, however, have poor time resolution, it is difficult to get temporal information of the cortical activities. The magnetoencephalography (MEG) is suitable for investigating the temporal sequence of the activation of cortical areas on speech, since MEG has good temporal and spatial resolution. The present study is a trial to identify functionally the motor speech center in the frontal lobe of human cerebral cortex by using multichannel SQUID gradiometers. Parts of the results have been reported shortly [8].

Keywords

Left Handedness 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    Broca, P. Remarques sur le siège de la faculté du langage articulé, suivies d’une observation d’aphémie, Bull. Soc. Anat., 1861,36: 330–357.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    Deecke, L., Engel, M., Lang, W. and Kornhuber, W.W. Bereitschaftspotential preceding speech after holding breath, Exp. Brain Res., 1986, 65: 219–223.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. [3]
    Hinke, R.M., Hu, X., Stillman, A.E., Kim S.G., Merkel, H., Salmi, R. and Ugurbil, K. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of Broca’s area during internal speech, Neuroreport, 1993,4: 675–678.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. [4]
    Oldfield, R.C. The assessment and analysis of handedness: the Edinburgh Inventory., Neuropsychologia, 1971, 9:97–113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. [5]
    Roland, P. Brain Activation, New York, Wiley-Liss, 1993.Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    Salmelin, R., Hari, R., Lounasmaa, O.V. and Sams, M. Dynamics of brain activation during picture naming, Nature, 1994, 368: 463–465.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. [7]
    Sasaki, K., Tsujimoto, T., Nambu, A., Matsuzaki, R. and Kyuhou, S. Dynamic activities of the frontal association cortex in calculating and thinking, Neurosci. Res., 1994, 19: 229–233.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. [8]
    Sasaki, K., Kyuhou, S., Nambu, A., Matsuzaki, R., Tsujimoto, T. and Gemba, H. Motor speech centres in the frontal cortex, Neurosci. Res., 1995, 22: 245–248.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Kyuhou
    • 1
  • K. Sasaki
    • 1
  • A. Nambu
    • 1
  • R. Matsuzaki
    • 1
  • T. Tsujimoto
    • 1
  • H. Gemba
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute for Physiological SciencesOkazakiJapan

Personalised recommendations