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Summary of Prospective Global Change Impacts on Northern U.S. Forest Ecosystems

  • Richard A. Birdsey
  • Robert A. Mickler
  • John Hom
  • Linda S. Heath
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 139)

Abstract

In January 1989, the President’s Fiscal Year 1990 Budget to the Congress was accompanied by a report entitled, “Our Changing Planet: A U.S. Strategy for Global Change Research” (Committee on Earth Sciences, 1989). The report focused the attention of policy makers on the significant environmental issues arising from natural and human-induced changes in the global Earth system. The report announced the beginning of a research program, the U.S. Global Change Research Program, with a mission to improve our understanding of the causes, processes, and consequences of the changes affecting our planet. Interest in global change was heightened in 1990 with the publication of “Climate change: The IPCC Scientific Assessment” (Houghton et al., 1990) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), jointly sponsored by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environmental Programme. This assessment was updated and new technical issues were added in the second assessment volumes, “Climate Change 1995: The Science of Climate Change”(Houghton et al., 1996) and “Climate Change 1995: Impacts, Adaptations, and Mitigation of Climate Change” (Watson et al., 1996). The first IPCC assessment in 1990 and subsequent assessments have concluded that continued accumulation of anthropogenic greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will lead to climate change whose rate and magnitude are likely to have important impacts on natural and human systems.

Keywords

Cold Tolerance Sugar Maple Freezing Injury Northern Forest Elevated Carbon Dioxide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard A. Birdsey
  • Robert A. Mickler
  • John Hom
  • Linda S. Heath

There are no affiliations available

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