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The Hearing Organs of Lizards

  • Geoffrey A. Manley
Part of the Springer Handbook of Auditory Research book series (SHAR, volume 13)

Abstract

The reader may well ask the question: Why deal with the hearing organ of lizards and not all reptiles? The answer lies in the great diversity of the group of animals placed under the old term “reptiles”; it has long been recognized that they are a highly diverse assemblage of animals. This diversity is equally great in the structure of their hearing organs, and at least three basic structures of hearing organs can be distinguished, the turtle type, the archosaur type, and the lizard type. One of the “reptilian” lines, the crocodiles, alligators, and their relatives, are more closely related to the birds than to other reptiles and they are placed with the birds in the group Archosauria. The characteristics of their hearing organs is dealt with in this volume by Gleich and Manley in Chapter 3. The turtles or Chelonia are difficult to classify, and the only certain thing is that they have been a separate group since the Triassic period. Since my earlier review (Manley 1990), much work has been carried out on the ion channels of their hair cells (e.g., Ricci and Fettiplace 1998), but to cover all this work would exceed the limits of the present review.

Keywords

Hair Cell Basilar Membrane Tuning Curve Otoacoustic Emission Tectorial Membrane 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • Geoffrey A. Manley

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