Neuroimaging pp 491-530 | Cite as

Congenital Brain Anomalies

  • Cheng-Yu Chen
  • Robert A. Zimmerman

Abstract

Congenital brain malformations are abnormal developments of the brain that occur during intrauterine life. These anomalies of the central nervous system cause approximately 25% of perinatal deaths1 and account for one third of all major anomalies diagnosed at or after birth.2 The causes of congenital brain anomalies are poorly understood, although some clinical and experimental evidence indicates that a variety of factors, including genetic (chromosome abnormality), environmental (ionizing radiation, toxic agents), infection (rubella and cytomegalovirus), and nutrition (hypervitaminosis A) might play roles.3–5 Generally, developmental malformations are either a morphological abnormality (organogenesis) or an abnormal cellular differentiation (histogenesis).

Keywords

Migration Assimilation Neurol Crest Astrocytoma 

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cheng-Yu Chen
  • Robert A. Zimmerman

There are no affiliations available

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