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Large Deformation Wave Codes

  • J. M. McGlaun
  • P. Yarrington
Chapter
Part of the High-Pressure Shock Compression of Condensed Matter book series (SHOCKWAVE)

Abstract

In this section, we discuss the role of numerical simulations in studying the response of materials and structures to large deformation or shock loading. The methods we consider here are based on solving discrete approximations to the continuum equations of mass, momentum, and energy balance. Such computational techniques have found widespread use for research and engineering applications in government, industry, and academia.

Keywords

Large Deformation Sandia National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Wave Code Slide Surface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York  1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. M. McGlaun
    • 1
  • P. Yarrington
    • 1
  1. 1.Sandia National LaboratoriesAlbuquerqueUSA

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