Introduction and Summary

  • Wesley L. Schaible
Part of the Lecture Notes in Statistics book series (LNS, volume 108)

Abstract

Federal statistical agencies produce estimates of a variety of population quantities for both the nation as a whole and for subnational domains. Domains are commonly defined by demographic and socioeconomic variables. However, geographic location is perhaps the single variable used most frequently to define domains. Regions, states, counties, and metropolitan areas are common geographic domains for which estimates are required. Federal agencies use different data systems and estimation methods to produce domain estimates. Those systems designed for the purpose of producing published estimates use standard, direct estimation methods. Data systems are designed within time, cost and other constraints which restrict the number of estimates that can be produced by standard methods. However, the demand for additional information and the lack of resources to design the required data systems have led federal statistical agencies to consider non-standard methods. Estimation methods of a particular type, referred to as small area or indirect estimators, have sometimes been used in these situations.

Keywords

Income 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wesley L. Schaible
    • 1
  1. 1.Bureau of Labor StatisticsUSA

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