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In Vivo Neutron Activation Analysis of Organ Cadmium Burdens

Referent Levels in Liver and Kidney and the Impact of Smoking
  • D. M. Franklin
  • C. J. G. Guthrie
  • D. R. Chettle
  • M. C. Scott
  • H. J. Mason
  • A. G. Davison
  • A. J. Newman Taylor

Abstract

In vivo neutron activation measurements of liver and kidney cadmium have been made in 77 exposed workers and 101 referents. Cadmium levels were higher in exposed workers than in referents; both in liver, 25.7 cf. 0.6μg/g, and kidney, 17.9 cf. 2.7 mg. The 19 referents who never smoked had lower mean organ cadmium burdens than the other referents, the difference achieving statistical significance in the kidney, p<.01. Cigaret smoking was estimated to increase cadmium body burden by 370± 140μg/pack year. These referent cadmium levels are similar to, although slightly below, previous in vivo and autopsy data.

Index Entries

in vivo neutron activation liver cadmium kidney cadmium industrial cadmium exposure cadmium and smoking referent cadmium levels 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. M. Franklin
    • 1
  • C. J. G. Guthrie
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. R. Chettle
    • 1
  • M. C. Scott
    • 1
  • H. J. Mason
    • 3
  • A. G. Davison
    • 4
  • A. J. Newman Taylor
    • 4
  1. 1.School of Physics and Space ResearchUniversity of BirminghamBirminghamEngland
  2. 2.Communicable Diseases (Scotland) UnitRuchill HospitalGlasgowScotland
  3. 3.Health and Safety ExecutiveOccupational Hygiene and Medicine LaboratoriesLondonEngland
  4. 4.Cardiothoracic Institute Brompton HospitalLondonEngland

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