Determinants of Neurological Disease Induced by Theiler’s Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus

  • Raymond P. Roos
  • Nancy Casteel

Abstract

Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) designates a group of strains of a naturally occurring murine picornavirus of one serotype, which causes asymptomatic enteric infections and, on rare occasions, paralysis. Strains of the virus can be placed in two subgroups on the basis of the central nervous system (CNS) infection they induce in experimental mice. One subgroup (GDVII) is composed of the GDVII and FA strains, which are highly virulent and cause a rapid and fatal encephalitis when injected intracranially. The second subgroup (TO) is composed of strains that are less virulent and produce a chronic demyelinating disease that resembles multiple sclerosis (MS). TO subgroup strains persist at low levels in the CNS, and thus demyelination may be the result of a restricted infection of oligodendrocytes. However, evidence suggests that immunemediated mechanisms may also play a role in the chronic disease, as is believed to be the case with MS as well. The availability of the mouse as both natural and experimental host, and the large amount of molecular information known about picornaviruses have made TMEV-induced disease a valuable experimental model. Investigations of the TMEV model may lead to a better understanding of neurovirulence, TMEV experimental de-myelinating disease, and perhaps MS as well.

Keywords

Dust Attenuation Codon Titration Trypsin 

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond P. Roos
  • Nancy Casteel

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