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Hybrid Models for Motion Control Systems

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Part of the Progress in Systems and Control Theory book series (PSCT,volume 14)

Abstract

This paper presents a mathematical framework for modeling motion control systems and other families of computer controlled devices that are guided by symbol strings as well as real valued functions. It discusses a particular method of organizing the lower level structure of such systems and argues that this method is widely applicable. Because the models used here capture important aspects of control and computer engineering relevant to the real-time performance of symbol/signal systems, they can be used to explore questions involving the joint optimization of instruction set and speed of execution. Finally, some comparisons are made between engineering and biological motion control systems, suggesting that the basic ideas advanced here are consistent with some aspects of motor control in animals.

Keywords

  • Hybrid System
  • Hybrid Model
  • Tool Path
  • Motion Control
  • Premotor Cortex

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Engi?neering Research Center Program, NSF D CRD-8803012, the US Army Research Office under grant DAAL03-92-G-0164 (Center for Intelligent Control Systems), DARPA and the Air Force under contract F49620-92-J-0466, and by the Office of Naval Research under contract N00014-92-J-1887, while the author was a visiting Professor at the Charles Stark Draper Laboratories, Cambridge, Mass.

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© 1993 Springer Science+Business Media New York

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Brockett, R.W. (1993). Hybrid Models for Motion Control Systems. In: Trentelman, H.L., Willems, J.C. (eds) Essays on Control. Progress in Systems and Control Theory, vol 14. Birkhäuser, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-0313-1_2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-0313-1_2

  • Publisher Name: Birkhäuser, Boston, MA

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4612-6702-7

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4612-0313-1

  • eBook Packages: Springer Book Archive