Biosorption and Desorption of Copper (II) Ions by Bacillus sp

  • Waihung Lo
  • Lau Mei Ng
  • Hong Chua
  • Peter H. F. Yu
  • Shirley N. Sin
  • Po-Keung Wong
Part of the Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology book series (ABAB)

Abstract

Batch biosorption experiments were conducted to investigate the removal of Cu2+ ions from aqueous solutions by a series of bacterial strains isolated from a local activated sludge process. The characteristics of 12 isolates were identified and examined for their ability to bind Cu2+ ions from aqueous solution. Among the isolates, two species exhibited biosorption capacity >40 mg of Cu/g of dry cell. Isotherms for the biosorption of copper on bacterial cells were developed and compared, and the equilibrium data fitted well to the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The biosorption of copper increased significantly with increasing pH from 2.0 to 6.0 regardless of the species. More than 90% of copper sorbed on the cells of Bacillus sp. could be recovered by washing with 0.1 M HNO3 for 5 min. The performance of two different desorption processes was also tested and compared. The results show that five biosorption and desorption cycles are a better operation process than five successive biosorptions followed by one desorption to remove and recover copper from aqueous solution. The biosorbent could be used for at least five biosorptions and desorption cycles without loss of copper removal capacity. It can be concluded that the activated sludge or sludge-isolated bacteria could be a potential biosorbent for copper removal.

Index Entries

Activated sludge bacteria bioremediation copper desorption heavy metal metal removal wastewater treatment process 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Environmental Protection Department (1991), Technical memorandum—Standards for effluents discharged into drainage and sewerage systems, inland and coastal waters, Hong Kong Government, Hong Kong SAR.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Volesky, B. and Holan, Z. R. (1995), Biotechnol. Prog. 11, 235–250.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Butter, J., Evison, L. M., and Hamcock, I. C. (1998), Water Res. 32(2), 400–406.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Lo, W., Chua, H., Wong, M. F., and Yu, P. F. (2003), Water Sci. Technol. 47, 251–256.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kasan, H. C. (1993), Crit. Rev. Environ. Sci. Technol. 23(1), 79–117.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Lo, W., Chua, H., Lam, K. H., and Bi, S. P. (1999), Chemosphere 39(15), 2723–2736.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Leung, W. C, Wong, M. F., Chua, H., Lo, W., Yu, P. H. F., and Leung, C. K. (2000), Water Sci. Technol. 41(12), 233–240.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Wong, M. F., Chua, H., Lo, W., Leung, C. K., and Yu, P. H. F. (2001), Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 91–93, 447–457.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Zhang, L., Zhao, L., Yu, Y., and Chen, C. (1998), Water Res. 32(5), 1437–1444.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Chang, J. S., Law, R., and Chang, C. C. (1997), Water Res. 31(7), 1654–1658.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Volesky, B. and May-Phillips, H. A. (1995), Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 42, 797–806.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Niu, H., Xu, X. S., Wang, J. H., and Volesky, B. (1993), Biotechnol. Bioeng. 42, 785–787.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Waihung Lo
    • 1
  • Lau Mei Ng
    • 1
  • Hong Chua
    • 2
  • Peter H. F. Yu
    • 1
  • Shirley N. Sin
    • 2
  • Po-Keung Wong
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology and the Open Laboratory of Chiral TechnologyThe Hong Kong Polytechnic UniversityHung HomHong Kong SAR
  2. 2.Department of Civil and Structural EngineeringThe Hong Kong Polytechnic UniversityHung HomHong Kong SAR
  3. 3.Department of BiologyThe Chinese University of Hong KongShatinHong Kong SAR

Personalised recommendations