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Composition and Ethanol Production Potential of Cotton Gin Residues

Part of the Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology book series (ABAB)

Abstract

Cotton gin residue (CGR) collected from five cotton gins was fractionated and characterized for summative composition. The major fractions of the CGR varied widely between cotton gins and consisted of clean lint (5–12%), hulls (16–48%), seeds (6–24%), motes (16–24%), and leaves (14–30%). The summative composition varied within and between cotton gins and consisted of ash (7.9–14.6%), acid-insoluble material (18–26%), xylan (4–15%), and cellulose (20–38%). Overlimed steam-exploded cotton gin waste was readily fermented to ethanol by Escherichia coli KO11. Ethanol yields were feedstock and severity dependent and ranged from 58 to 92.5% of the theoretical yields. The highest ethanol yield was 191 L (50 gal)/t, and the lowest was 120 L (32 gal)/t.

Index entries

Cotton gin waste steam explosion characterization summative composition 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Foster A. Agblevor
    • 1
  • Sandra Batz
    • 1
  • Jessica Trumbo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biological Systems EngineeringVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA

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