Creative Collaboration in Young Digital Communities

  • Pilar Lacasa
  • María Ruth García-Pernía
  • Sara Cortés
Part of the Springer Series on Cultural Computing book series (SSCC)

Abstract

We recently attended several video game fairs in different European cities. Some researchers, such as Wortley (Simul Gaming 44(2–3):452–465, 2013), refer to these contexts as a starting point for exploring creativity and innovation. These fairs are quite similar to film festivals, even if there are no real actors or celebrities there. Instead, we find large screens, consoles, new forms of entertainment, and the players (the visitors to the fair) take precedence. While walking around the different stands, they don’t just observe; they play and discover the novelties created by the industry of these cultural objects. Wandering around people of all ages, families, and groups of friends (more boys than girls), the thought came to us that we are witnessing the result of innovation, the ability to create in contemporary society.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pilar Lacasa
    • 1
  • María Ruth García-Pernía
    • 1
  • Sara Cortés
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Philology, Communication and InformationUniversity of AlcaláMadridSpain

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