The Internet Is Ancient, Small Steps Are Important, and Four Other Theses About Making Things in a Digital World

Part of the Springer Series on Cultural Computing book series (SSCC)

Abstract

Human beings have been creative, and made things, for many thousands of years. Indeed, the evidence suggests that the first human tools were made almost two million years ago (Donald, A mind so rare: the evolution of human consciousness. W. W. Norton, New York, 2001). Digital technologies and the internet have not initiated creativity, therefore, but they have certainly given creative practices a boost, by enabling several things to be achieved much more simply and quickly: connections between people, distribution of material, conversations about it, collaborations, and opportunities to build on the work of others.

Keywords

Steam Turkey Expense Arena Boulder 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Media, Arts and DesignUniversity of WestminsterLondonUK

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