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Public Reporting of Pediatric Cardiac Data

  • Vinay BadhwarEmail author
  • J. William Gaynor
  • Jeffrey P. Jacobs
  • David M. Shahian
Chapter

Abstract

Public reporting of outcomes and quality in cardiac surgery is part of a national effort to improve performance and accountability in healthcare. There have been pioneering efforts to justly tabulate and report clinical risk-adjusted data with much experience gained over the last decade. We are now on the threshold of national public reporting in congenital heart surgery. Our objective is to outline the foundation for public reporting of cardiac surgical outcomes and describe the recent progress and future direction for public reporting of pediatric cardiac data.

Keywords

Outcome assessment Database analysis Congenital heart surgery Public reporting 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vinay Badhwar
    • 1
    Email author
  • J. William Gaynor
    • 2
  • Jeffrey P. Jacobs
    • 3
    • 4
  • David M. Shahian
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Cardiothoracic SurgeryCenter for Quality Outcomes and Research, Presbyterian University Hospital, University of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Department of Cardiac SurgeryThe Children’s Hospital of PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.Division of Cardiac Surgery, Department of SurgeryJohns Hopkins All Children’s Heart Institute, All Children’s Hospital and Florida Hospital for Children, Johns Hopkins UniversityTampa and OrlandoUSA
  4. 4.Division of Cardiac Surgery, Department of SurgeryJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  5. 5.Department of SurgeryCenter for Quality and Safety, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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