Desmoplastic Fibroma of Bone

Abstract

Desmoplastic fibroma of bone is an intraosseous, locally aggressive neoplasm, constituted by spindle cells and abundant collagen production. Beta-catenin is usually positive in the cytoplasm of neoplastic cells. It corresponds to less than 0.1 % of primary bone neoplasms. Its main incidence is in the second and third decade of life. Males correspond to more than 70 % of the cases. Most cases occur in the jaw; metaphysis of long bones, especially the distal end of the radius; scapula; and pelvis. Radiographs show a lytic, well-defined lesion, with no peripheral sclerosis or periosteal reaction. Soft tissue expansion of the lesion may occur. Wide en bloc resection is the treatment of choice.

Keywords

Desmoid Fibromatosis Aggressive Bone Desmoplastic 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratory of Orthopaedic PathologyBuenos AiresArgentina
  2. 2.Department of Surgical PathologyA.C. Camargo Cancer CenterSão PauloBrazil

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