Blount Disease

Chapter

Abstract

Blount’s disease is progressive pathologic genu varum centred at the tibia. The aetiology is likely multifactorial but surely related to mechanical overload in genetically susceptible individuals. In 1937 Blount reported 13 cases and reviewed all of the 15 cases that were reported in the literature up to that time. Blount suggested the term Tibia Vara, however, the eponym drawn from his name remains in common use. The disease is best divided into distinct entities: Infantile Blount’s and adolescent’s Blount’s. The infantile type, to which this classification applies, is more common, presents to children 0–3 years of age and typically affects both lower extremities. The adolescent type refers to children older than 10 years of age, is less severe and is more likely to be unilateral.

Keywords

Depression 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Academic Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, School of MedicineUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK

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